1. If you went to Coachella last weekend, you probably had a ball. But will your ears pay the price?

    While short-term hearing loss caused by loud noise can be unnerving, it may not be an automatic sign of permanent damage.

    Temporary hearing loss may actually be the ear’s way of protecting itself from lasting damage, suggests a published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Well, if you’re a mouse, at any rate.

  2. Cramped conditions and inadequate access to water are both common risk factors among mobile food vendors. What was surprising was the contamination risk posed by a source that hasn’t gotten much attention in the past: the security wristbands that both food vendors and attendees are often required to wear at these events. Fully 20 percent of wristbands sampled were covered with gut-busting bacteria like E. coli.

    — 

    NPR’s food blog on studies of the risk of foodborne illnesses at music festivals

    If you are heading to Coachella this weekend, take heart: Tyler Skrove, who oversees food inspections at the festival, tells NPR that inspectors have never had a report of foodborne illness at the festival in the three years he’s been on the job.

  3. Tell me if you’ve heard this one: Two scientists walk into a metal show, and notice that fans behave like molecules in a gas.

    Tell me if you’ve heard this one: Two scientists walk into a metal show, and notice that fans behave like molecules in a gas.

  4. Eggplant as bass drum? Carrots as hi-hat? Grapes as bells? Yes, you’ll want to watch J.Viewz play a beautiful — and just plain awesome — cover of Massive Attack’s 1998 hit “Teardrop” on a variety of fruits and vegetables.
Photo: Jay Silver/Flickr

    Eggplant as bass drum? Carrots as hi-hat? Grapes as bells? Yes, you’ll want to watch J.Viewz play a beautiful — and just plain awesome — cover of Massive Attack’s 1998 hit “Teardrop” on a variety of fruits and vegetables.

    Photo: Jay Silver/Flickr

  5. Do orchestras really need conductors? A computer science study shows that conductors play decisive roles in the performance of orchestras.
Photo: James Garrett/New York Daily News via Getty Images

    Do orchestras really need conductors? A computer science study shows that conductors play decisive roles in the performance of orchestras.

    Photo: James Garrett/New York Daily News via Getty Images

  6. smithsonianmag:

    Squid Chromatophores React to Cypress Hill’s Insane in the Membrane

    During experiments on the axons of the Woods Hole squid, we tested our cockroach leg stimulus protocol on the squid’s chromatophores. The results were both interesting and beautiful.

    Video: backyardbrains

    Ed note: Now that you know squid cells like hip hop, here are 14 more facts about cephalopods.

    h/t Geekosystem

    "Yes, I’m the pirate, pilot of this ship / If I get with the ultraviolet dream / Hide from the red light beam / Now do you believe in the unseen?”

  7. One-over-f equations describe the relative frequency of things that happen over time and can be used to describe such naturally occurring events as annual river flooding or the beating of a human heart. They have been used to describe the way pitch is used in music as well, but until now, no one has thought to test the idea that they could be used to describe the rhythm of the music too.

    — Science!