1. 
Genius mixes and streaming and algorithms all have their place — a big place — in the way we discover new music, but machines don’t and can’t capture the essence of a relationship.

— As Valentine’s Day approaches, Stephen Thompson defends the art of the mixtape
Photo: Leah Tihia/via Flickr

    Genius mixes and streaming and algorithms all have their place — a big place — in the way we discover new music, but machines don’t and can’t capture the essence of a relationship.

    — As Valentine’s Day approaches, Stephen Thompson defends the art of the mixtape

    Photo: Leah Tihia/via Flickr

  2. 
Whatever coded messages about love and nostalgia lay hidden in the track list were lost on me. Everything I heard was new territory, and it was spellbinding. I enjoyed my first encounters with Elliott Smith and PJ Harvey, a lo-fi gem by the acoustic shredder Mary Lou Lord, curveballs like the Canadian pop-punk outfit Treble Charger and hard evidence that Blur had music beyond “Song 2.” In retrospect, 2000 was probably the last year I listened to commercial radio or watched MTV with any regularity. It was the year I turned 16, the year my household finally got an Internet connection and, due in part to those milestones, the year I developed something resembling taste and began to seek out culture rather than waiting for it to come to me. The tape was a treasure in that sense, shining a light on wonders unknown. But lurking among them was something for which I was not prepared. Something menacing.

— Daoud Tyler-Ameen on his first time hearing Le Tigre on a mixtape meant for someone else

    Whatever coded messages about love and nostalgia lay hidden in the track list were lost on me. Everything I heard was new territory, and it was spellbinding. I enjoyed my first encounters with Elliott Smith and PJ Harvey, a lo-fi gem by the acoustic shredder Mary Lou Lord, curveballs like the Canadian pop-punk outfit Treble Charger and hard evidence that Blur had music beyond “Song 2.” In retrospect, 2000 was probably the last year I listened to commercial radio or watched MTV with any regularity. It was the year I turned 16, the year my household finally got an Internet connection and, due in part to those milestones, the year I developed something resembling taste and began to seek out culture rather than waiting for it to come to me. The tape was a treasure in that sense, shining a light on wonders unknown. But lurking among them was something for which I was not prepared. Something menacing.

    — Daoud Tyler-Ameen on his first time hearing Le Tigre on a mixtape meant for someone else

  3. Protip: If you’re going to make a mixtape for a special someone, DO NOT INCLUDE “EVERY BREATHE YOU TAKE.”

    via How To Make A Mixtape Without Looking Like A Creeper

  4. mtvhive:

Want.

Type II High Bias… Oak?

    mtvhive:

    Want.

    Type II High Bias… Oak?

    (Source: complexmagazine)