1. Even as The Beatles reached the Top 10 in Britain, appeared on TV and had young women swooning by the thousands across the pond, the band’s first singles in the U.S. were released on tiny independent labels and went nowhere. What went wrong, and finally right, in the leadup to the night of Feb. 7, 1964.
Photo: Express Newspapers/Getty Images

    Even as The Beatles reached the Top 10 in Britain, appeared on TV and had young women swooning by the thousands across the pond, the band’s first singles in the U.S. were released on tiny independent labels and went nowhere. What went wrong, and finally right, in the leadup to the night of Feb. 7, 1964.

    Photo: Express Newspapers/Getty Images

  2. nprfreshair:

Kevin Howlett restored the BBC's archive of The Beatles on BBC radio and TV early in their career. Today he explains the juxtaposition of the “radical” Beatles and the more formal radio and TV actors:

I think it’s important to put yourself back in that era, and this is the year [1963] before it all happens in America and internationally, this is the breakthrough year for The Beatles, make or break time. And what they were doing was revolutionary and shocking: the choice of material, the way they were allowed to be themselves on the air and be so witty and irreverent, all in a very good-natured way, but the culture clash of the cheeky lads from Liverpool with the trained actors who might be presenting programs with them.

photo cred: Harry Myers/Rex Features

    nprfreshair:

    Kevin Howlett restored the BBC's archive of The Beatles on BBC radio and TV early in their career. Today he explains the juxtaposition of the “radical” Beatles and the more formal radio and TV actors:

    I think it’s important to put yourself back in that era, and this is the year [1963] before it all happens in America and internationally, this is the breakthrough year for The Beatles, make or break time. And what they were doing was revolutionary and shocking: the choice of material, the way they were allowed to be themselves on the air and be so witty and irreverent, all in a very good-natured way, but the culture clash of the cheeky lads from Liverpool with the trained actors who might be presenting programs with them.

    photo cred: Harry Myers/Rex Features

  3. In an essay in this month’s issue of The Atlantic, Colin Fleming argues that the Fab Four’s most emblematic, “Beatle-esque” year was 1963, before they’d even made it big in the States. His evidence? A set of sessions that John, Paul, George and Ringo recorded that year at the BBC, which Fleming argues are the quintessence of everything the grouped would be come.
Hear the sessions, and the debate, on today’s Weekend Edition.
Photo: The Beatles pose in Liverpool’s Derby Square in February 1963. Michael Ward/Getty Images

    In an essay in this month’s issue of The Atlantic, Colin Fleming argues that the Fab Four’s most emblematic, “Beatle-esque” year was 1963, before they’d even made it big in the States. His evidence? A set of sessions that John, Paul, George and Ringo recorded that year at the BBC, which Fleming argues are the quintessence of everything the grouped would be come.

    Hear the sessions, and the debate, on today’s Weekend Edition.

    Photo: The Beatles pose in Liverpool’s Derby Square in February 1963. Michael Ward/Getty Images

  4. soundcheckradio:

    “What happens when you take 100 different copies of a Beatles White Album first pressing vinyl record and lay them on top of each other? Artist Rutherford Chang, who collects only first pressing White Albums has the answer.”

    More on Rutherford Chang’s White Album exhibit.

  5. Soundnprfreshair:

Sometimes we humans get stuff wrong. Case in point: In 1969, Fresh Air music critic Ed Ward was less than enthusiastic about Abbey Road. Ooops. Oh well. Live and learn.
WNYC Soundcheck:








The Beatles’ Abbey Road — now ranked #14 on the Greatest Album of All-Time list by Rolling Stone — was skewered by critic Ed Ward in the magazine’s pages in 1969. “Eeeeeeeeek. It’s The Beatles,” Ward wrote. But, when we caught up with Ward, who spoke to us from his home in France, he said “I have changed my views slightly toward the positive. Time has a way of doing that.”

    Soundnprfreshair:

    Sometimes we humans get stuff wrong. Case in point: In 1969, Fresh Air music critic Ed Ward was less than enthusiastic about Abbey Road. Ooops. Oh well. Live and learn.

    WNYC Soundcheck:

    The Beatles’ Abbey Road — now ranked #14 on the Greatest Album of All-Time list by Rolling Stone — was skewered by critic Ed Ward in the magazine’s pages in 1969. “Eeeeeeeeek. It’s The Beatles,” Ward wrote. But, when we caught up with Ward, who spoke to us from his home in France, he said “I have changed my views slightly toward the positive. Time has a way of doing that.”

  6. The same brain system that controls our muscles also helps us remember music, scientists say. But the discovery might never have happened without The Beatles.

    The same brain system that controls our muscles also helps us remember music, scientists say. But the discovery might never have happened without The Beatles.

  7. From becoming the world’s first-ever custom recording studio to facing an era of low-budget self-recording, Abbey Road continues to push boundaries.

    via From Elgar To The Beatles: The History Of Abbey Road Studios

    Photos: The Beatles (1967), George Martin, Kate Bush, Stevie Wonder (1980), all at Abbey Road, courtesy of Bloomsbury Publishing

  8. theswingingsixties:

The Beatles, ‘She Loves You’ - gif

That last harmony… gets me every time.

    theswingingsixties:

    The Beatles, ‘She Loves You’ - gif

    That last harmony… gets me every time.

    (Source: i-am-the-oracular-spectacular)

  9. nprfreshair:

    When John and I had just finished writing the song “She Loves You,” we were in the parlor of the little house we lived in in Liverpool, and John and I went next door to one of the rooms where my dad was. And we played it — ‘She loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah’ — and he said, ‘Oh, that’s very good, son. But there’s just one thing. Couldn’t you sing, “She loves you, yes, yes, yes?”’ He said, ‘There’s enough of these Americanisms around.’ And we said, ‘No, sorry Dad, it’s got to be “yeah, yeah, yeah.”’ — Paul McCartney [full interview here]