• Both musicians grew up on the West Coast.
    • Both musicians owe their early success to frequent DIY touring and hustle independent of major record labels. 
    • Both artists experienced some of their biggest hits with self-consciously non-traditional songs.
    • Both artists have made it a point to use their artistic platforms to advance social causes.

  1. Dave Brubeck never tired of playing his greatest hits. But both before and after his seminal 1959 album Time Out, the pianist took his craft to college kids, to churches, to musicals, to social-justice concerns and to the imaginations of countless new jazz fans.

    Go beyond “Take Five.”

  2. Professional musicians eventually may say, ‘OK, we figured out some changes in rhythms that influenced us to think about.’ But the main point is the vitality that keeps going. I always called jazz the life force and, my goodness, Mr. Brubeck exemplifies that.

    — Jazz critic Nat Hentoff on jazz musician Dave Brubeck, who died just one day shy of his 92nd birthday

  3. Just one day shy of 92, David Brubeck has died. We are working on a proper obit for the jazz pianist, but the meantime, download a one-hour documentary on the man who made “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo a la Turk” such enduring standards.
Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

    Just one day shy of 92, David Brubeck has died. We are working on a proper obit for the jazz pianist, but the meantime, download a one-hour documentary on the man who made “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo a la Turk” such enduring standards.

    Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images