1. There is something about your story, because you haven’t made an album in four decades — in a way it’s like you’ve stepped out of this time machine, and you’re bringing the power of your music to people in a different era who weren’t with you back then.
I am, but let’s go a little deeper here: Timelessness also matches transcendence. I happen to be passionately in love with the universe and who I feel created it. And when you love the universe like I do, you are lining up with eternal things or things that certainly are eons old; you are not lining up with fads. I had to be told what “techno” means. I had to be told there’s an argument between non-techno and techno, a little bit like Bob Dylan went through when he wanted to use an electric guitar. I mean, of course he wanted to experiment; of course he wanted to use everything he could. Creators want to branch out.
Our human fads are so temporary and they come and go so quickly. The things that last have a greater balance with these things that are more eternal. I always want to go to the universe and use things that have a timeless quality, that match the eons, that match the flow of nature. My music comes to me, usually, like rain: It’s a fast flood. It pours from above my head, through my head, and I have to race to get pencil and paper to catch it.
Linda Perhacs on her first album in 44 years on Morning Edition.

    There is something about your story, because you haven’t made an album in four decades — in a way it’s like you’ve stepped out of this time machine, and you’re bringing the power of your music to people in a different era who weren’t with you back then.

    I am, but let’s go a little deeper here: Timelessness also matches transcendence. I happen to be passionately in love with the universe and who I feel created it. And when you love the universe like I do, you are lining up with eternal things or things that certainly are eons old; you are not lining up with fads. I had to be told what “techno” means. I had to be told there’s an argument between non-techno and techno, a little bit like Bob Dylan went through when he wanted to use an electric guitar. I mean, of course he wanted to experiment; of course he wanted to use everything he could. Creators want to branch out.

    Our human fads are so temporary and they come and go so quickly. The things that last have a greater balance with these things that are more eternal. I always want to go to the universe and use things that have a timeless quality, that match the eons, that match the flow of nature. My music comes to me, usually, like rain: It’s a fast flood. It pours from above my head, through my head, and I have to race to get pencil and paper to catch it.

    Linda Perhacs on her first album in 44 years on Morning Edition.