1. Marisa Anderson brought her small guitarmy to NPR’s Tiny Desk and kicked up some dirt. 

    Marisa Anderson brought her small guitarmy to NPR’s Tiny Desk and kicked up some dirt

  2. doomandgloomfromthetomb:

Lewis Reed - Copyright Demo, May 1965
Something interesting popped up on Lou Reed’s Facebook page this week: 
We thought it’d be cool to share a photograph of one of the more “mythical” artifacts of Lou and the VU. 
Lou mentioned this in an interview a while back (Q Magazine in 1996, I think), that he’d recently unearthed a demo he had mailed to himself in 1965, the reason for which is known as “the poor man’s copyright.” 
In classic Lou style, he had this to say about the discovery: “I’m not going to listen to it. I don’t want to hear these things any more.” 
Well, here’s what it looks like. And no, we haven’t opened it.
So! What do you think is on it? Judging from the May postmark, my bet is that it’s this demo reel Lou recorded that month (with John Cale in tow) at Pickwick’s studios in Queens. Info via the VU Web page: 
May 11, 1965John Cale - Lou Reed - Jerry Vance or Jimmie Sims 
Buzz Buzz Buzz (one complete take + a couple of attempts breaking down) Why Don’t You Smile Now Heroin (take 1) Heroin (take 2) Untitled Piano Piece 1 Untitled Piano Piece 1
Here’s what VU scholar Richie Unterberger has to say about the demo:
Never circulated even on bootleg, but heard by this author, these were done for Pickwick Records. Of by far the most note are the first two known recordings of “Heroin,” as two takes done right each other. Though with more of a Dylanesque talking folk-blues feel than the version the Velvet Underground would record for their first album about a year later (and with yet more of a folk-blues feel than the sparse July 1965 demo on the Peel Slowly and See box set), the lyrics are even at this early stage virtually identical, the arrangement even including the same accelerating tempos. Of lesser but certainly considerable interest, the tape also includes a Reed version of “Why Don’t You Smile Now,” a song he and John Cale were credited (along with other Pickwick staff songwriters) with writing that was covered on mid-1960s singles by the All Night Workers and the Downliners Sect. Also on the tape is a relatively trivial Reed tune titled “Buzz Buzz Buzz” that bears slight similarities to Chuck Berry’s “Memphis,” and an untitled John Cale solo piano instrumental that sounds much like the piano part he plays on “All Tomorrow’s Parties.”
You can actually hear one of those “Heroin” takes — it was played at Lou’s memorial service last year. But I don’t think anything else has surfaced. And hey, I could be totally wrong and this box could contain something else entirely. Maybe the mythical “Never Get Emotionally Involved with a Man, Woman, Beast or Child”? 
Let’s open the box! 

OPEN THE BOX. 

    doomandgloomfromthetomb:

    Lewis Reed - Copyright Demo, May 1965

    Something interesting popped up on Lou Reed’s Facebook page this week: 

    We thought it’d be cool to share a photograph of one of the more “mythical” artifacts of Lou and the VU.

    Lou mentioned this in an interview a while back (Q Magazine in 1996, I think), that he’d recently unearthed a demo he had mailed to himself in 1965, the reason for which is known as “the poor man’s copyright.”

    In classic Lou style, he had this to say about the discovery: “I’m not going to listen to it. I don’t want to hear these things any more.”

    Well, here’s what it looks like. And no, we haven’t opened it.

    So! What do you think is on it? Judging from the May postmark, my bet is that it’s this demo reel Lou recorded that month (with John Cale in tow) at Pickwick’s studios in Queens. Info via the VU Web page

    May 11, 1965
    John Cale - Lou Reed - Jerry Vance or Jimmie Sims

    Buzz Buzz Buzz (one complete take + a couple of attempts breaking down)
    Why Don’t You Smile Now
    Heroin (take 1)
    Heroin (take 2)
    Untitled Piano Piece 1 
    Untitled Piano Piece 1

    Here’s what VU scholar Richie Unterberger has to say about the demo:

    Never circulated even on bootleg, but heard by this author, these were done for Pickwick Records. Of by far the most note are the first two known recordings of “Heroin,” as two takes done right each other. Though with more of a Dylanesque talking folk-blues feel than the version the Velvet Underground would record for their first album about a year later (and with yet more of a folk-blues feel than the sparse July 1965 demo on the Peel Slowly and See box set), the lyrics are even at this early stage virtually identical, the arrangement even including the same accelerating tempos. Of lesser but certainly considerable interest, the tape also includes a Reed version of “Why Don’t You Smile Now,” a song he and John Cale were credited (along with other Pickwick staff songwriters) with writing that was covered on mid-1960s singles by the All Night Workers and the Downliners Sect. Also on the tape is a relatively trivial Reed tune titled “Buzz Buzz Buzz” that bears slight similarities to Chuck Berry’s “Memphis,” and an untitled John Cale solo piano instrumental that sounds much like the piano part he plays on “All Tomorrow’s Parties.”

    You can actually hear one of those “Heroin” takes — it was played at Lou’s memorial service last year. But I don’t think anything else has surfaced. And hey, I could be totally wrong and this box could contain something else entirely. Maybe the mythical “Never Get Emotionally Involved with a Man, Woman, Beast or Child”? 

    Let’s open the box! 

    OPEN THE BOX. 

  3. The secret of the Essence Festival is that it gathers half a million people every year to celebrate the vibrant art and achievement of black women — and the men who love black women — on a scale that is woefully absent in other aspects of mainstream culture.

    — Jason King says it time for the mainstream media to pay attention to the Essence Festival in New Orleans. 

  4. From Adult Swim’s singles series, hear the first song in 20 years from stoner-metal band Sleep

  5. Download: 5 Discoveries To Stretch Folk’s Limits at @newportfolkfest
Photo: Dana Yavin

    Download: 5 Discoveries To Stretch Folk’s Limits at @newportfolkfest

    Photo: Dana Yavin

  6. Watch NPR’s Tiny Desk turn into a church, comedy club and neo-soul spot with The Foreign Exchange. 

    Watch NPR’s Tiny Desk turn into a church, comedy club and neo-soul spot with The Foreign Exchange

  7. 20 years ago today, the Three Tenors sang the hits and changed the classical music game.

  8. Watch Brody Dalle, the former lead singer of The Distillers, perform a personal anthem, “Dressed in Dreams,” surrounded by chili-pepper lights

  9. This one just might bring you to tears.
Watch Holly Williams play NPR’s Tiny Desk. 

    This one just might bring you to tears.

    Watch Holly Williams play NPR’s Tiny Desk

  10. pbsdigitalstudios:

    Rufus and David Yow are a match made in mac-rimony. Go cocoNUTS for this macaroon recipe while enjoying the silly cooking styles of Rufus and David Yow in this episode of Pancake Mountain

    http://youtu.be/D7B0M2aqZcM

    What in the…