1. nprontheroad:

This is the calm before the storm known as WOMEX.

Every October, thousands of music professionals — artists, managers, presenters, label executives, press folks and the like — descend on some European city for five days of nonstop showcases, panel discussions, meetings, film screenings and schmoozing. Officially, it’s the World Music Expo, but I’ve never heard anybody call it that in all the years I’ve been coming, off and on. (This is my seventh time at this particular rodeo.)

A friend of mine calls this the “WOMEX vortex,” and he’s not wrong. This is SXSW for the international set, and where a huge chunk of music business transactions take place, with more than 2000 delegates coming from about 100 countries. Want to know what hot acts from Europe, Asia, Africa and beyond are going to be hitting the North American touring circuit in the next one to two years? This is the place to find most of them first.

WOMEX moves to a different European city every year. This year’s WOMEX is taking place in Santiago de Compostela, a small city in the northwest of Spain, in the region of Galicia. Santiago is best known as a pilgrimage site for devoted Catholics, who walk hundreds of miles across ancient paths to reach the Santiago Cathedral and what, as legend has it, is the tomb of the apostle James.

But as of tomorrow, the tourist mix is going to include a couple of thousand folks who might be more interested in Saint Cecilia — the patron saint of music. (Remember the old Simon and Garfunkel song?) Me, I’m taking one last deep breath today before diving in.

Follow NPR Music’s Anastasia Tsioulcas here and on Twitter as she explore the WOMEX Festival, this year in Spain! —Lars

    nprontheroad:

    This is the calm before the storm known as WOMEX.
    Every October, thousands of music professionals — artists, managers, presenters, label executives, press folks and the like — descend on some European city for five days of nonstop showcases, panel discussions, meetings, film screenings and schmoozing. Officially, it’s the World Music Expo, but I’ve never heard anybody call it that in all the years I’ve been coming, off and on. (This is my seventh time at this particular rodeo.)
    A friend of mine calls this the “WOMEX vortex,” and he’s not wrong. This is SXSW for the international set, and where a huge chunk of music business transactions take place, with more than 2000 delegates coming from about 100 countries. Want to know what hot acts from Europe, Asia, Africa and beyond are going to be hitting the North American touring circuit in the next one to two years? This is the place to find most of them first.
    WOMEX moves to a different European city every year. This year’s WOMEX is taking place in Santiago de Compostela, a small city in the northwest of Spain, in the region of Galicia. Santiago is best known as a pilgrimage site for devoted Catholics, who walk hundreds of miles across ancient paths to reach the Santiago Cathedral and what, as legend has it, is the tomb of the apostle James.
    But as of tomorrow, the tourist mix is going to include a couple of thousand folks who might be more interested in Saint Cecilia — the patron saint of music. (Remember the old Simon and Garfunkel song?) Me, I’m taking one last deep breath today before diving in.

    Follow NPR Music’s Anastasia Tsioulcas here and on Twitter as she explore the WOMEX Festival, this year in Spain! —Lars

  2. Daaaaang, T.I., that sweater. He wore it to an in-depth interview on Microphone Check. 
Photo: Polina Yamshchikov for NPR

    Daaaaang, T.I., that sweater. He wore it to an in-depth interview on Microphone Check

    Photo: Polina Yamshchikov for NPR

  3. bandwidthdc:

    Three EX HEX GIFs. Just ‘cause.

    (Lovingly assembled by wamu885 intern Will Reid, who worked on our recent in-studio session with the band.)

    Well, yes. —Lars

  4. Download: 10 Songs Public Radio Can’t Stop Playing
Includes new music by Son Little, Ty Segall, Rome Fortune, Allo Darlin’ and more. 
Photo: Todd Cooper

    Download: 10 Songs Public Radio Can’t Stop Playing

    Includes new music by Son Little, Ty Segall, Rome Fortune, Allo Darlin’ and more.

    Photo: Todd Cooper

  5. This Broken Water video is oddly satisfying in the same way that thingsfittingperfectlyintothings is.

    This Broken Water video is oddly satisfying in the same way that thingsfittingperfectlyintothings is.

  6. An otherworldly adventure, Daniel Lanois' new album has no songs and no words, using voices only for texture.
Stream Flesh and Machine from NPR Music’s First Listen. 

    An otherworldly adventure, Daniel Lanois' new album has no songs and no words, using voices only for texture.

    Stream Flesh and Machine from NPR Music’s First Listen

  7. The shoegaze-y L.A. rock band Medicine never quite caught on in the ’90s, but its renaissance continues to produce new wrinkles.
Stream Home Everywhere from NPR Music’s First Listen.

    The shoegaze-y L.A. rock band Medicine never quite caught on in the ’90s, but its renaissance continues to produce new wrinkles.

    Stream Home Everywhere from NPR Music’s First Listen.

  8. With its roots in punk and heartland rock, restorations’ LP3 is a rattling, unpinnable record that doesn’t know when to stop baring its soul.
Stream LP3 from NPR Music’s First Listen. 

    With its roots in punk and heartland rock, restorations LP3 is a rattling, unpinnable record that doesn’t know when to stop baring its soul.

    Stream LP3 from NPR Music’s First Listen

  9. Yusuf, formerly known as Cat Stevens, tackles weighty existential questions by looking backward, using the blues to unlock buried memories.
Stream Tell ‘Em I’m Gone from NPR Music’s First Listen. 

    Yusuf, formerly known as Cat Stevens, tackles weighty existential questions by looking backward, using the blues to unlock buried memories.

    Stream Tell ‘Em I’m Gone from NPR Music’s First Listen

  10. The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame
Photo: Ken Schles/Getty Images

    The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

    Photo: Ken Schles/Getty Images